Muslim job applicants apparently experience more discrimination if they are open about their religious identification

The UConn study has important findings for human resources and legal professionals in companies, who need to prevent discrimination in the workplace

Muslim job applicants apparently experience more discrimination if they are open about their religious identification

New research by University of Connecticut (UConn) sociologists apparently shows discrimination against Muslim job applicants in two regions of the United States. The study also shows employers are less likely to respond to an application if a resume includes content which shows membership in a faith group, with those who are Muslims experiencing the most bias by possible employers.

The new study comes as the number of complaints of religious discrimination has increased, as evidenced by the number of U.S. lawsuits and charges, InsideCounselreported. Between 1992 and 2010, the number of complaints filed with the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission alleging religious discrimination increased from 1,388 to 3,790.

As part of their study, the researchers submitted resumes for four fictional recent college graduates to a popular job-listing website. Each resume included a religious preference – Catholic, evangelical Christian, atheist, Jewish, Muslim, pagan, Wallonian [a fictional faith], or no religious affiliation, so there was a control group for the study.

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Ed Silverstein

Ed Silverstein is a veteran writer and editor for magazines, websites and newspapers. A graduate of Harvard's Kennedy School of Government, he has won several...

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