Understanding remote collections for e-discovery: Benefits, pitfalls and use cases (Part 2)

Remote collections can be less time consuming and less intrusive than on-site collections

In an earlier article, we discussed the practice of remote collection — a data collection method that allows the e-discovery practitioner or forensic expert handling the collection to do so from a location other than where the data is physically stored. The article covered the various methods for remote collection and its key benefits over on-site collection for e-discovery.

The most frequently cited benefit is cost savings. On-site collection requires an expert to travel to and from the site. Not only does a remote process save on airfare, hotel and incidentals, there is no bill for an outside consultant’s travel time. This, combined with the fact that e-discovery deadlines are often challenging to meet, has led to an increase in legal teams leveraging remote collections. Despite the many benefits, there are potential pitfalls that must be carefully considered. This article will discuss some of these considerations and outline the types of cases that are often best suited for remote collections.

Contributing Author

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Erik Hammerquist

Erik Hammerquist is a Senior Director of the Computer Forensics segment of FTI Consulting’s Technology practice and is based in Los Angeles.

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Contributing Author

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Jim Scarazzo

Jim Scarazzo is a director in the FTI Technology practice and is based in Washington, D.C.

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Contributing Author

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Daniel Roffman

Daniel E. Roffman is a Managing Director in the FTI Technology segment and is based in Chicago. Mr. Roffman has more than eight years of experience...

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