The EEOC offers guidance on religious garb and grooming in the workplace

In most cases, employers covered by Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 must make exceptions to their usual rules or preferences

The number of lawsuits and charges over the past few years involving claims of religious discrimination indisputably is on the rise. In March 2014, the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) issued guidance on how employers can meet their legal responsibilities with respect to religious dress and grooming practices, a particular focus of several of the more recent lawsuits involving claims of religious discrimination.

The guidance posits the EEOC's default position that in most cases, employers covered by Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 must make exceptions to their usual rules or preferences to permit applicants and employees to follow religious dress and grooming practices.

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Jill Vorobiev

Jill Vorobiev is a member of Dykema's Labor and Employment Group, with an emphasis on labor and employment litigation. Her practice covers a broad-base, representing corporate clients...

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