SCOTUS declines to take an early look at spy program case

The Supreme Court turned down a request to take an early look on whether the U.S. government’s gathering of Americans’ phone records is unlawful

On April 7, 2014, the Supreme Court of the United States turned down a request to take an early look on whether the U.S. government’s gathering of Americans’ phone records is unlawful.  That decision means the dispute will have to work its way through the usual lower-court process. The justices rejected the request without comment, and now, it could take many months before the justices look at any legal challenge to the controversial surveillance. Attorney, conservative and fighter for good government Larry Klayman is the main engine behind the case.

The NSA surveillance came to light after former government contractor Edward Snowden disclosed the collection to U.S. and British media last year. The documents revealed that a U.S. surveillance court had “secretly approved” the collection of millions of phone records in the United States, such as the length of calls and the numbers dialed.

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Alexis Harrison

Alexis Harrison is a Connecticut-based writer and public relations professional whose career spans both print journalism and broadcast news. Alexis started her professional life as...

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