Big Data comes to the forefront

Recent tech trend forecast expects the use of Big Data to combat cybercrime

The concept of Big Data is one that has gained increasing interest from corporations and consumers alike in recent years and it appears the topic is finally ready to break into the limelight. According to Ovum, a consulting firm that tracks technology trends, 2014 will be the year that businesses start leverage Big Data to combat cybersecurity threats.

Cybersecurity and data intrusion attacks have made headlines throughout this past year, and with companies spending billions to combat them annually, there is huge need to get a leg up on would be intruders.  But with no clear authority on the topic, the space can be difficult for enterprises to navigate.

The Kroll Global Fraud report recently showed that 21 percent of companies are highly vulnerable to cyber threats, with 75 percent registering as moderately vulnerable. Thirty-seven percent of respondents blame the increase of these attacks on the increasing complexity of their IT infrastructure.

“Enterprise organizations will need to gain positive advantages from security intelligence, Big Data analytics, and the ability to understand threat priorities and the actions needed to sustain the well-being of the organization and its users,” said Andrew Kellett, Principal Analyst, Software and author of Ovum’s Security 2014 Trends to Watch report, in a statement.

The volume of attacks is expected to continue to increase in 2014, but the ability to collect, catalog and offer solutions via Big Data relies on pattern identification. The software is arguably at its strongest when it has a wealth of incidents to draw from. And while the implementation Big Data or predictive analytics software is prohibitively expensive, only possible for deep-pocketed corporations, the advent of software-as-a-service solutions makes it a viable option for smaller companies as well.

Obviously the need to more effectively managed cybersecurity is on top of mind for most organizations. Recently the National Institute of Science and Technology released a preliminary framework aiming to offer best practices for data protection, and with many, including the legal department, taking notice of the importance of cybersecurity; you can expect to see this conversation continue to grow.

 

For more on the cybersecurity battleground, check out these articles:

 

The legal counselors’ role in cybersecurity response

Cybersecurity a top concern for general counsel

Hotel chain says FTC has no right to police its data security methods

Managing Editor

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Rich Steeves

Richard P. Steeves is Managing Editor of InsideCounsel magazine, where he covers the intellectual property and compliance arenas. Rich earned a B.A. in English Literature...

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