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Nebraska Attorney General Jon Bruning to talk patent trolls at upcoming roundtable

Bruning, along with attorneys general from Vermont and Missouri, will discuss the problem at a Nov. 19 event in New York City

Nebraska Attorney General Jon Bruning

Some call them “non-practicing entities” or “patent assertion entities,” but Nebraska Attorney General Jon Bruning calls it like he sees it, referring to them as patent trolls. 

The attorney general is direct and clear in his beliefs about patent trolls, declaring that these entities are engaged in scams against consumers and saying that they use tactics to frighten and extort money from small businesses and non-profits that are often not legally sophisticated.

Bruning feels that the problem of patent trolls requires a multi-front attack, including legislative changes on a state and federal level and a bipartisan, multi-state coalition of attorneys general. On this front, he is proud to be working with like-minded attorneys general, including Vermont Attorney General Bill Sorrell, on what Bruning considers a truly bipartisan issue.

“This is not just about protecting Fortune 500 companies, but small business and non-profits as well from harassment by patent trolls,” Bruning told InsideCounsel in an exclusive interview. “This is a consumer protection issue, not just a patent issue.”

As part of his effort to build awareness of the topic so that Congress can take action and his colleagues can join him with new and innovative strategies, Bruning feels it is important to have corporate legal minds understand what government agencies are up to. To this end, he is attending a special roundtable discussion that will focus on the issue of patent trolls. The roundtable, which will also include Bill Sorrell and Missouri Attorney General Chris Koster, will take place on Tuesday, Nov. 19, 2013 in New York City. For more information or to register for the event, click here.

 

To read more about patent trolls, check out the stories below:

 

Tech companies push for reform to tackle patent trolls

USPTO director talks challenges and change at AIPLA conference

IP: Is it safe to settle? Patent holders have reason to think twice

Patent reform gets support from hospitality, retail spaces

Managing Editor

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Rich Steeves

Richard P. Steeves is Managing Editor of InsideCounsel magazine, where he covers the intellectual property and compliance arenas. Rich earned a B.A. in English Literature...

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