Quiz: Test your knowledge of September’s top legal news

Recapping the most significant — or just plain strangest — news stories of the past month

September

 

Another month gone, another InsideCounsel news quiz. Read through the following 10 questions, then click through to the next page to discover how much you remember about Septembers's most significant and strangest top legal stories.

 

1. Which major bank was recently ordered to pay $2.2 million after the Department of Labor ruled it had racially discriminated in its hiring practices at its Charlotte, N.C., location?

  1. Wells Fargo
  2. JPMorgan Chase
  3. Bank of America
  4. CitiGroup

 

2. Philadelphia-based law firm Duane Morris is making some moves: It became the first U.S. law firm to expand into what Asian country in early September?

  1. Nepal
  2. Myanmar
  3. North Korea
  4. Turkmenistan

 

3. Don’t bet on this legislation quite yet: The Federal Circuit Court of Appeals recently shot down which state’s attempt at legalizing sports betting?

  1. New Jersey
  2. Massachusetts
  3. New York
  4. Virginia

 

4. I doubt they “Like” this: Which major social media website is under fire from the Federal Trade Commission for privacy issues in the company’s updated Terms of Use agreement?

  1. Pinterest
  2. Facebook
  3. Twitter
  4. LinkedIn

 

5. Which popular website is being accused of retaliation by a San Diego lawyer who originally sued the website with a claim that his paid-for ads were never posted?

  1. Facebook
  2. Yelp
  3. Google
  4. InsideCounsel

 

6. What is the U.S. government attempting to decrease via a new provision to a 2010 act called FACTA?

  1. Cybercrime related to privacy issues
  2. Insider trading between shareholders and government officials
  3. Unpaid overtime for interns
  4. Tax evasion through offshore bank accounts

 

7. Don’t mess with China Central Television (CCTV): The state-owned television station recently levied corruption allegations against a leading producer of what baby-oriented product?

  1. Formula
  2. Diapers
  3. Bottles
  4. Car seats

 

8. According to a study, what part of a company do 1/3 of corporate directors fail to understand?

  1. Payroll
  2. Legal compliance
  3. IT
  4. Boardroom ethics

 

9. Attorneys general from how many states have joined the Department of Justice in attempting to block the U.S. Airways-American Airlines merger?

  1. Three
  2. Seven
  3. Thirteen
  4. Twenty-seven

 

10. Which European country’s authorities recently joined the U.S. Department of Justice and Securities and Exchange Commission in investigating Hewlett-Packard for bribery?

  1. Germany
  2. France
  3. Italy
  4. Poland


Answers on the next page, so have your scoresheet ready.

Bank of America

 

1. Which major bank was recently ordered to pay $2.2 million after the Department of Labor ruled it had racially discriminated in its hiring practices at its Charlotte, N.C., location?

  1. Wells Fargo
  2. JPMorgan Chase
  3. Bank of America
  4. CitiGroup

 

3. Bank of America

The bank was accused of “unfair and consistent selection criteria” in Charlotte, N.C., which made some job-seekers more than a little angry. A class of 1,147 African Americans who had attempted to work at Bank of America between 1993 and 2005 received $2.2 million to split among them. “Wherever doors of opportunity are unfairly closed to workers, we will be there to open them — no matter how long it takes.” Patricia A. Shiu, director of the DOL’s Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs (OFCCP), said.

 

Myanmar

 

2. Philadelphia-based law firm Duane Morris is making some moves: It became the first U.S. law firm to expand into what Asian country in early September?

  1. Nepal
  2. Myanmar
  3. North Korea
  4. Turkmenistan

 

2. Myanmar

U.S. law firms have been all over the map recently, so it may come as somewhat of a surprise that nobody has entered the legal market in the country formerly known as Burma. But Duane Morris believes the company’s move into Myanmar can open up some important business opportunities. “Myanmar presents significant opportunities for foreign businesses, and our new presence there will allow us to provide on-the-ground, high-quality counsel to foreign and domestic businesses seeking to seize those opportunities while minimizing the inherent risks,” Duane Morris Chairman and CEO John Soroko said.

 

New Jersey

 

3. Don’t bet on this legislation quite yet: The Federal Circuit Court of Appeals recently shot down which state’s attempt at legalizing sports betting?

  1. New Jersey
  2. Massachusetts
  3. New York
  4. Virginia

 

1. New Jersey

The New Jersey legislature passed a law that would allow betting on professional and college sports at racetracks and Atlantic City casinos, but just like seemingly everything coming from the Jets and Giants this season, the pass was intercepted. The 3rd Circuit shut down the law, saying the 1992 Professional and Amateur Sports Protection Act, a statute that restricts sports gambling, took precedent. “We will continue to fight this injustice by either appealing to the U.S. Supreme Court or to the entire Court of Appeals,” state Senator Raymond J. Lesniak said in response.

 

Facebook

 

4. I doubt they “Like” this: Which major social media website is under fire from the Federal Trade Commission for privacy issues in the company’s updated Terms of Use agreement?

  1. Pinterest
  2. Facebook
  3. Twitter
  4. LinkedIn

 

2. Facebook

All of the litigation always seems to involve Facebook, doesn’t it? The web’s largest social media website is under fire once again, as several privacy groups sent letters to the FTC claiming that Facebook’s proposed changes violated the social media company’s 2011 settlement with the FTC. The Commission agreed to look into Facebook’s activity, saying in a statement, “As in all cases, we’re monitoring compliance with the order, and part of that involves interacting with Facebook.” For its part, Facebook says the changes are meant to bring more transparency to what information is shared.

 

Yelp

 

5. Which popular website is being accused of retaliation by a San Diego lawyer who originally sued the website with a claim that his paid-for ads were never posted?

  1. Facebook
  2. Yelp
  3. Google
  4. InsideCounsel

 

2. Yelp

OK, so maybe not everything is Facebook. This time it’s Yelp getting in some litigation trouble, as Julian McMillian claims he purchased ads on Yelp, only to have Yelp not follow through. A judge agreed with McMillian’s claims and ordered Yelp to reimburse the attorney the $2,700 he paid plus administrative fees. But in August, days before Yelp’s appeal of the case was due to go to court, the company sued McMillian over false positive reviews that Yelp claims he and employees placed on the site. Yelp says the timing had nothing to do with the other suit, but McMillian says, “This is their way of swatting down a gnat. They’re trying to get me to spend money because they want to give pause to the next business that sues them.”

 

Tax evasion

 

6. What is the U.S. government attempting to decrease via a new provision to a 2010 act called FACTA?

  1. Cybercrime related to privacy issues
  2. Insider trading between shareholders and government officials
  3. Unpaid overtime for interns
  4. Tax evasion through offshore bank accounts

 

4. Tax evasion through offshore bank accounts

FACTA stands for the Foreign Account Tax Compliance Act, and if U.S. government officials have their way, it will mean fewer places to hide for those wishing to stash their earnings overseas. The new provision in question would require foreign financial institutions to report information about their U.S. account holders to the Internal Revenue Service (IRS). This includes both U.S. citizens and U.S. green card holders, no matter where they are living. “FATCA is a dragnet meant to force transparency and curtail tax evasion around the world,” Christine Ballard, an international tax specialist at the accounting firm Moss Adams, told The Wall Street Journal.

 

Formula

 

7. Don’t mess with China Central Television (CCTV): The state-owned television station recently levied corruption allegations against a leading producer of what baby-oriented product?

  1. Formula
  2. Diapers
  3. Bottles
  4. Car seats

 

1. Formula

Baby formula -- so innocent and wholesome, right? Wrong, says China Central Television. A CCTV report from September says that Dumex, a subsidiary of French company Danone SA, paid off hospitals to use its products and improve the sale and distribution of its baby formula. A Dumex spokesman says the company is “shocked by the CCTV report.” This is just the latest lawsuit by the Chinese government against a multinational corporation, as corruption accusations were also brought against both GlaxoSmithKline and Bayer in July.

 

IT

 

8. According to a study, what part of a company do 1/3 of corporate directors fail to understand?

  1. Payroll
  2. Legal compliance
  3. IT
  4. Boardroom ethics

 

3. IT

I bet some jaded in-house counsel answered “boardroom ethics,” but it’s indeed information technology that plagues many corporate directors today. PricewaterhouseCoopers released its US 2013 Annual Corporate Directors Survey in early September. The study found that 32 percent of respondents say they do not understand IT enough to support the company’s strategy and IT risk mitigation. 15 percent say IT is critical at their companies (up 2 percent from 2012), and 61 percent want to spend more on IT-related risk within the coming year.

 

Seven

 

9. Attorneys general from how many states have joined the Department of Justice in attempting to block the U.S. Airways-American Airlines merger?

  1. Three
  2. Seven
  3. Thirteen
  4. Twenty-seven

 

2. Seven

The proposed merger between U.S. Airways Group Inc. and AMR Corp., the parent company of American Airlines, would create the world’s largest airline. But the Department of Justice also sees that combined airline as a threat to pricing on many major air routes, so it filed an antitrust suit against the merger in August. Originally, attorneys general from six states with high air traffic — Arizona, Florida, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Texas and Virginia —joined the DOJ’s antitrust suit, but Michigan joined the suit in early September to make it seven.


Poland


10. Which European country’s authorities recently joined the U.S. Department of Justice and Securities and Exchange Commission in investigating Hewlett-Packard for bribery?

  1. Germany
  2. France
  3. Italy
  4. Poland

 

4. Poland

And no, they didn’t bribe them with extra pierogies. The Polish government is assisting the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) and Securities and Exchange Commission in investigating Hewlett-Packard over allegations that an employee of a Polish division of HP was involved in certain forbidden public sector transactions. The DOJ says the employee may be in violation of the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act, which forbids the use of bribes to foreign officials for business purposes. HP isn’t alone in gaining the DOJ’s watchful eye either, as both Microsoft and IBM have been questioned over similar claims.


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