10 things to consider when bringing e-discovery in-house

An estimated three-year cost model that includes some less-than-obvious expenses

This is the second in a series of three articles intended to assist with cost factors and return on investment (ROI) for e-discovery. Read the first installment here. The third article will deal with the metrics and cost of review.

E-discovery can be daunting and costly. We look to reduce review costs with predictive coding and advanced analytics and we look to reduce technology costs for processing, hosting and storage. Bringing e-discovery in-house is the right move for some but may not be for others. Sometimes, a hybrid solution works best. Since some acquisition costs are not very obvious, here is a model to help you make your decisions:

6. What about software, hardware, training and staff?

These are the hard and obvious costs. The pro forma illustrates license, license term, maintenance, updates, servers, storage, installation, outside staff training, inside user training, ongoing training, add-ons for advanced tools such as analytics, and minimum levels of staffing to sustain an in-house program. Of course numbers will vary depending on your priorities and size. If the numbers surprise you, recognize that any serious capability you may want in-house is much more complex than just desktop software. You cannot count on IT just to come over and run this without an IT service level agreement; you will need your own client-facing staff and you will need dedicated IT staff to run and maintain the systems. Below is a sample list of costs:

Contributing Author

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Peter Coons

Peter Coons is senior vice president, Strategic Initatives for D4, LLC.

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Contributing Author

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Chuck Kellner

Chuck Kellner is Senior Vice President, Advisory & Engineering Group, D4, a national leader in litigation support and e-discovery services to law firms...

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